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Why is an English teacher or ex English teacher considered low in expat community?



smurf
2 Jul 2014  #21

There is no difference between an expat and an immigrant

Naw man, I hate the expat label.

I'm an immigrant Ithat left Ireland and moved to Poland. An expat is sent abroad by a company from their homeland.

Gawd I do hate that term expat, it's like they're too good for their new country. People don't know the proper definitions. The vast majority of foreigners are mostly likely immigrants.

Especially TEFL teachers.
Roger5
2 Jul 2014  #22

Gawd I do hate that term expat, it's like they're too good for their new country.

Makes me think of retired brigadiers necking G'n'Ts on the verandah and barking at the servants in broken English.

The vast majority of foreigners are mostly likely immigrants.

I don't have a problem with that.
Barney
2 Jul 2014  #23

Naw man, I hate the expat label.

Gawd I do hate that term expat, it's like they're too good for their new country.

I agree I was always an immigrant

Makes me think of retired brigadiers necking G'n'Ts on the verandah and barking at the servants in broken English.

Exactly, people thinking they are better than other humans.

English teachers or not, if you can earn a crust fair play to you
Harry
2 Jul 2014  #24

it's like they're too good for their new country.

No, it's that they are there to do a job which they have been sent there to do and once that job is finished they are off. An immigrant moves to a country to settle there, an expat is sent to a job.

People don't know the proper definitions.

The proper definition has a habit of changing depending on one's viewpoint.
Wulkan
2 Jul 2014  #25

Naw man, I hate the expat label.

I'm an immigrant Ithat left Ireland and moved to Poland. An expat is sent abroad by a company from their homeland.

Gawd I do hate that term expat, it's like they're too good for their new country.

You really impressed me right now.
Sparks11
12 Jul 2014  #26

The difference between an English teacher and a more "traditional" expat i.e. someone doing a highly skilled/specialized work abroad, is that the traditional expat probably earns about three times (or more) as much money and therefore doesn't wander around in a state of permanent scruffiness :)
Wulkan
12 Jul 2014  #27

All you say is correct and since this forum is full of English teachers you can understand why there is so much fuss about it.
jon357
12 Jul 2014  #28

Mind you, how would you classify someone sent by their employer, the UK government, do do something connected to ELT for a year or so at a western salary and with expenses, flights, furniture allowance etc?
smurf
12 Jul 2014  #29

sent by their employer, the UK government,

Well, if sent by an employer then they are an ex-pat.

The problem with the term and what I meant by people thinking they are better when they use it is that they use it incorrectly and deem the term 'immigrant' as demeaning.

Y'know I don't get why someone would think that calling themselves an ex-pat when in reality they're actually an immigrant would make any bit of difference? It's an ego thing for the people who use it incorrectly. I've no problem with a person using it at all whatsoever if they are actually sent here by a foreign company to take up a post.

Makes me think of retired brigadiers necking G'n'Ts on the verandah and barking at the servants in broken English.

Yea, I'd have to agree with ya Roger.

People must have awful self-esteem issues when they think that a wrongly used label will give them a better social standing. Like 'Oh you're an ex-pat, you didn't willingly come to Poland, you were sent here.' Do people really think that that's a good image to portray? Oh we peasants are so lucky to share the same soil as one so gifted as you who were sent here to show us the way.

Boll!x.

It's all nonsense, we're all mostly in the same boat here and can't see why most of us can't all get along. Putting a label on yourself will only create a distance between fellow foreigners.
Wulkan
12 Jul 2014  #30

That's truth
Maluch
13 Jul 2014  #31

ex-pat doesn't really have any negative connotations to me - just means someone who isn't originally from there.

"Foreigners" has a bit of a negative connotation back in north america, but Polish people use it so commonly that I have started using it myself when asking them about their friends, etc. I don't think it really has a negative vibe here.
Wulkan
13 Jul 2014  #32

ex-pat doesn't really have any negative connotations to me

You didn't get it at all, people who deserve the name immigrant call themselves ex-pat to make themselves look better than they are, that's what is being said here.

just means someone who isn't originally from there.

there is much more complex definition of the term expat that this.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Expatriate
smurf
14 Jul 2014  #33

just means someone who isn't originally from there.

No, it doesn't.

if you bothered to read the thread you're posting in then you'd know the actual meaning.
Wulkan
15 Jul 2014  #34

if you bothered to read the thread you're posting in then you'd know the actual meaning.

Exactly
PC_Sceptic
15 Jul 2014  #35

English Teacher or any other skilled individual who goes to work abroad in his/her profession is considered expat in common daily lingo now days. I know what wikipedia says.

oxforddictionaries.com/us/definition/american_english/expatriate

I am a veteran of Indonesian and Chinese Expats Forums... We even had a big discussion/fight, that if a British citizen who goes to work on contract to Jakarta for example (no matter the job) he/she should be called an immigrant.

If Mexicans who come to the US to work on temporary basis (legally) why in earth they aren't called expats?

Back to Indonesia and China, on both Forums,70- 80% of the job seekers are English teachers. mostly from UK and Canada and bit for US and Oz. And English is the only thing that they know. and the term Native-speaker is kind to them since all want Natives.

On expats forums they are arrogant just preying on folks from other non English speaking countries that dares to make a grammar mistake.
We called them Mr/Ms Dictionary.
English teachers have been using the expats forums basically for chit-chat and trying to impress native members, especially females with their charm & superb English language skills.

The real skilled work force from mostly from Europe some from India, had a real education in engineering, programming-IT, management etc or been ex workers on oil rigs/fields thus sought by Indonesian oil companies. and most of those avoided expats forums.

Plus we never got along with each other, including night outing, BBQ and so on.
Wulkan
15 Jul 2014  #36

And English is the only thing that they know. and the term Native-speaker is kind to them since all want Natives.
On expats forums they are arrogant

It seems to be a culture thing then because you have a lot of those on this forum too :-)
Levi_BR
10 Nov 2014  #37

Because most of them are refugees or backpackers.
But not all, of course.
Wulkan
10 Nov 2014  #38

Because most of them are refugees

Refugee an English teacher? Refugee wouldn't speak English as the first language which would be not enough to be an English teacher in Poland.
jon357
10 Nov 2014  #39

Because most of them are refugees or backpackers.

Very few of them. Those guys go to Thailand where the weather and food are better and the entertainment cheap.

Refugee wouldn't speak English as the first language which would be not enough to be an English teacher in Poland.

That plus an ability to teach and some decent experience.

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